RcTek : Information & Resources for the Model Car Racer

Radio Controlled Model Car Handling

This article is part of a section of the RcTek site devoted to radio controlled model car handling. As car handling is an extremely complex subject, it will be quite some time before it is finished.

It is a difficult decision on which articles to cover in which order and you must understand that model car handling is, in effect, a big jigsaw that interlocks at many different points.

The first articles are aimed at the basics as this will form the necessary understanding for the advanced subjects.

Model Car Handling Basics

Model Car Handling Basics

We have a few words about model car handling in general, in which we explain a crucial element that all should understand about the effects of most changes made to remote controlled model cars.

The Importance of the Circle to Model Car Handling

The Circle

The circle is an important consideration in model car handling. We have devoted an entire article to this humble shape.

Ackerman Steering Principle

Ackerman Steering Principle

Ackerman is a much used term in model car racing and refers to the angle of the steering arms. In this Adobe Flash enhanced article we explain all about Ackerman and non-Ackerman configurations.

How Toe Angle Affects Ackerman Angles

How Toe Angle Affects Ackerman Angles

As an extension to the Ackerman Steering Principle article we have further information about how toe angles affect Ackerman Steering angles.

Camber Angle Basics

Model Car Camber Angles

This article regarding model car handling sets out to explain the basics about negative and positive camber angles along with a suggestion for an easy way to remind yourself which is which.

Camber In & Camber Out

Camber In & Camber Out

There are many different ways in which a model car can be set up and this gives rise to possible confusion being caused by manufacturers and other model car drivers using unfamiliar terms. This short article explains the difference between Camber In & Camber Out.

Caster Angle Basics

Model Car Caster Angles

As part of our series about the basics of model car handling we have an article about positive and negative caster with a suggestion to easily remind you about the caster effect.

The Caster Angle Effect

The Caster Angle Effect

In this article we explain the caster angle effect and how it affects your model car, be it front, rear or four wheel drive.

Adjusting Caster Angles

Adjusting Caster Angles

There are many different ways that caster angles can be adjusted, in this article we introduce the most common methods and explain one of the side effects of such adjustments.

How Caster Angle Affects Camber Angle

Caster Angle Effects On Camber

The amount of caster on a model car affects the camber angles of the wheels when turning. This article demonstrates the effects of the caster angles on the camber of the wheels.

King Pin Inclination Angle

King Pin Inclination Angle

King Pin Inclination Angle (KPI) is, which is sometimes referred to as Steering Angle Inclination (SAI) has an effect on the camber change on your model car. This brief article only explains the basics in order to clarify a common misunderstanding.

Toe-in & Toe-out Angle Basics

Model Car Toe-in and out

As part of our introduction of the basic adjustment terminology of model cars, this article informs the reader what is meant by toe-in and toe-out, which is a relatively easy concept to understand.

Suspension Droop

Suspension Droop

Following a question (or two) on the Forum, we have a couple of articles about Suspension Droop and the Droop Setting Equipment you can use.

Using Weighing Scales to Set Up Model Cars

Weighing scales are used by some people to assist in the set-up of their cars. In this brief article we put forward the reasons why you would consider using them.

Note: Throughout this series of articles we have made extensive use of a drawing of a Formula One (F1) car. The use of this type of car is not meant to imply that the information only applies to Formula One cars, it simply allows for the angle of the wheels to be easily seen.

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© 2001, 2009 by Darren Burnhill